It’s a sin

So nearly a year after It’s a Sin was released in the UK, I have finally watched it. For those of you who haven’t watched it, it’s a drama set in the 80’s in London about the lives of a group of gay men and their friends during the HIV/AIDS crisis.

To be honest I must have missed all the hype when it was released as I only recently heard about it but then again, this time last year, I had a lot of stressful things going on. I also wasn’t sure if it would be my cup of tea as I knew it was going to be sad and I often watch light-hearted programmes or comedies as a way of switching off. However, after being told how good it was, I braced myself for tears and gave it a go. Within minutes I was hooked and ended up binge watching the entire series!

I loved the characters and thought the actors were incredible, I loved the music and thought it was very well written. You had a sense of how much fun they had and the true friendships that were made during this time and I envied them. Don’t get me wrong I obvious don’t envy the darker side of the story, in fact I found it heart-breaking to watch.

This killer disease that seemed to appear out of nowhere that was only affecting gay men was bound to cause huge controversy for everybody. Like the character Ritchie (played by Olly Alexander) I can see how you wouldn’t believe it and would think it has been made up as a gay disease. However, very quickly it seemed to be affecting more and more people as friends and colleagues went home never to be seen again.

When one character, Colin (played by Callum Scott Howells), became ill it was devastating as he was such a shy and reserved man who had lived a more reserved life in comparison to his friends. I loved his Mum though who despite living in remote Wales and no doubt being even less aware of gay life she stood by him throughout his illness with absolutely no judgement, it was clear that she loved her son unconditionally.

Of course, I believe all parents should love their children unconditionally, but this isn’t the case and nor was it with Ritchie’s Mum who prevented him from being with his friends and boyfriend whilst he was dying despite him asking for him and even worse, he died on his own. Quite rightly Jill who was his best friend told Ritchie’s Mum that it was her fault that he was on his own when it died, and I can’t imagine the pain she must have felt knowing she was staying nearby at the time.

I thought Jill (played by Lydia West) was an amazing woman! She stood by all her friends, was an HIV/AIDS activist and spent a lot of time visiting gay men who were dying in hospital alone. I take my hat off to her. Jills character was based on the life of Jill Nalder who played Jills Mum Christine, in the series. I wonder how she felt filming the series, I imagine she may have found it rather emotional, but she made a massive difference to the lives of gay men and their families.

Unsurprisingly the first episode was watched by over 1.6 million viewers which shortly went up to more than 18.9 million. Which made it more surprising when I discovered that originally Channel 4 refused to produce it. To me, there’s nothing in the series that shouldn’t be watched by anyone…we’re in 2022 for goodness sake! Surely by now, everyone is aware of HIV/AIDS and different sexualities??

For anyone who still struggles to get their head around sexuality other than heterosexuality, it isn’t a choice, no matter what you believe. Just like our eye colour, ethnicity and skin colour, sexuality is not a choice, it’s who we are. The only reason people may question or fight it is due to fear. Fear of judgement, fear of losing ‘friends’ or ‘family’, fear of never having children.

The best thing we can do for future generations is to normalise different sexualities from birth so that they are aware of it and know it’s accepted. Surely the most important thing is for our children to feel loved and supported no matter who they are.